I Messed Up

Last week I began to get discouraged again, as it seemed Annie was once again having seizures, and was lethargic and aggressive at times. It seems once we get her settled on a new drug or dose, she is good for a few weeks and then bam, downhill we go and we are troubleshooting TSC again.

Our Decade with Epilepsy and TSC

(In Honour of March 26, Wear Purple for Epilepsy Day) January 2004 – My twin baby girls were 5 months old.

I bit my lip hard in an effort not to cry. No one in that room knew that Annie was an identical twin. Nobody knew about Audrey, our other baby at home.

The looks of shock on the medical team’s faces

A Hallowed Welcome

“This is what they do in Canada!” As a young Dutch immigrant my mom was thrilled with trick or treating. Treats were few in their home and a meal often consisted of bacon fat poured over potatoes. Halloween was not celebrated in Holland and the trick or treating custom was fully embraced by my mom and her siblings. And they were good, Christian kids.

Expectations

Ten years ago, my twins were entering this world. We expected them with great anticipation and after many ultrasounds, and some concern about their size difference, the moment had finally arrived. Our baby girls made their entrance and all seemed perfect.

We expected no less.

I would like to say it was magical

More Than Memories

The phrase: “God doesn’t give us more than we can handle” is twisted scripture. I believe God gives us what He can handle – we just have to be willing to let Him handle it.

What does that mean? It means I am living a great life, in spite of chronic trial.

Joy in Monotony

Joy in Monotony

The jack hammer pounded the garage floor all day. Periodically, a saw blade screeched and the jack hammer took a brief rest. Next, the old floor was broken up and carried away by the bucket full, into the trailer and then driven to the landscape place and tossed into the awaiting pile. Saw, jack hammer, gather, fill, load, drive, unload, and drive back. It was back-breaking,

Ongoing Winter – Season of Hope

The Neurologist slid a piece of paper across table containing information about what could happen to Annie. Hearing that TSC was a disorder with a broad spectrum of how it affects an individual meant that there was hope that Annie would be normal if she were to be at the mild end of the spectrum. I was shaken but hopeful, and no doubt in denial.